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June 18th, 2015

Studying surgical outcomes to improve patient care

By Amy Olson
Dr. Charles H.  Mayo

Dr. Charles H. Mayo

For nearly 100 years, Mayo Clinic has been dedicated to evaluating surgical outcomes in order to improve patient care and reduce risks associated from surgery.

Dr. Charles H. Mayo said in 1930, “A surgical procedure should be planned so that the patient, with the least possible risk and loss of time, will receive the greatest benefit possible.”

This focus on improvement and better care continues today with the Surgical Care Improvement Project, which aims to evaluate the care of surgical patients at Mayo Clinic and determine the percentage who receive timely and effective care. The project focuses specifically on four types of surgical complications: surgical site infections, adverse cardiac events, deep vein thrombosis and postoperative pneumonia.

Mayo's continuous quality improvement efforts include a focus on reducing surgical site infections, adverse cardiac events, deep vein thrombosis and post-operative pneumonia.

Mayo's continuous quality improvement efforts include a focus on reducing surgical site infections, adverse cardiac events, deep vein thrombosis and post-operative pneumonia.

As Dr. Mayo also said, “In the conquering of serious diseases by surgical measures, it is important that the operation itself be as free from mortality as possible.”

The work continues through the Surgical Outcomes Program, which was founded in 2005 within the Mayo Clinic Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery. For example, Mayo’s research showed 96 percent of breast cancer patients needing lumpectomy avoid a second procedure within a month because a technique called frozen section analysis ensures surgeons remove cancerous tissues the first time.

Learn more about the program’s research findings and how they are improving patient care in this Mayo Clinic Advancing the Science blog post.

Tags: Arizona, Florida, Future of Health Care, Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, Mayo Clinic, Minnesota, Patient Care, quality improvement, surgical care, surgical outcomes

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